How a LibGuide Got Me to Italy

OK, well that headline might be a bit of an exaggeration..but just slightly. Let me explain.

In 2016, a professor at the university I work at was offering a cross-cultural experience course (a short-term study abroad) in Italy–all about travel writing. He asked one of our library staffers to help chaperone. This library staffer then told the professor that I should make a LibGuide for the course.

Students meet once per week in the semester before the travel for an introduction into the culture and history of the place they will be visiting. In preparation for the experience, students gather outside sources about the culture.

So I had some fun and did a LibGuide. I gathered up articles, books, and websites on travel writing, Italian traditions and culture, and info on the locales that students would be visiting. I’m not yea or nay on LibGuides–sometimes they are appropriate, sometimes not…just another useful tool in my librarian tool belt. In this case, it was an appropriate venue to organize the information.

Italy course LibGuide

Italy course LibGuide

I worked with the professor to schedule an information literacy session. Students liked the resources I put together and I shared my own experiences of visiting Rome as a college student.

The professor was effusive about the LibGuide and thanked me for creating it.

“You mean if I find a resource that might be helpful for the students, you could possibly add it to the LibGuide?”

Me: YES!

So 2017 rolls around. This time, the professor was going to be doing two sections of his Italy course and wanted to know if I would be willing to chaperone one of them.

Umm…yeah!

So in Spring semester 2017, I visited the students again for an info lit session and used the LibGuide. I tweaked it based off of the new itinerary the groups would be doing.

The professor and another chaperone took the first group of students over to Italy for three weeks. Then the chaperone and the first group flew back to the US.

Then it was my turn. On June 8, I met students at Chicago’s O’Hare airport, distributed their Euro stipend, and off we went to Florence, Italy, connecting through Zurich. We met the professor at the Florence airport.

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Florence

Herding students? No problem. Try getting 50+ faculty to schedule their required info lit sessions!

I loved getting to know the students. It was nice to put a name to face. I often saw the students in the library beforehand, but didn’t necessarily know them.

The three weeks in Italy was an absolute blast. I did some blogging on my travel site. We were based in Florence and saw all the big sites like the Duomo, Uffizi Gallery, and the Michelangelo’s David.

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Florence: Duomo

One day in Florence, we took a cooking class. We got to eat the pasta that the students made! For some, it was their first time as cooks.

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Florence cooking class

Venturing out from Florence on day trips, we visited enchanting Venice, under-the-radar Bologna, and beautiful Siena.

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Rialto Bridge, Venice

Naturally, the wine lover in me enjoyed our trip to Chianti country for a bit of history and winemaking…possibly my favorite day of the trip.

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Chianti country

During some free time, I made a solo trip to Pisa, and then with a small group of students, toured Milan.

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Milan: Cathedral

In my role as chaperone, I handled administrative matters (paperwork, travel, tickets, chief counter of students…), so the professor could focus on teaching.

But after 21 beautiful Italian days, it was time to come home. Summer seemed a bit short after I returned, but you’ll get no complaints from me! It was a privilege to join the professor and students.

Here are some photos from the Italy trip:

For more Italy pics, check out my Flickr album.

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Seattle: Seattle Public Library

Travel on the Side

Why did I visit a library on my vacation? Well, I am a librarian, of course!

If I see a library, I like to pop in and check it out. The Seattle Public Library Central Library is an architectural wonder. Soaring high, lots of glass, shiny escalators, natural light.

Are there books? Yes! But for me, a library is all about people. Lots of library patrons were on the computers researching, getting job help, reading, studying, and socializing.

One of the cool things I saw was near one of the circulation desks. Above was a monitor featuring a map of keywords of recently returned books.

Seattle Public Library Seattle Public Library

Travel tip: When you’re on vacation, a visit to the local public library is a good way to get restaurant recommendations and tips for “non-touristy” sites. Librarians are there to help…and they know EVERYTHING!

Below are some more photos. For the…

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Washington DC: Library of Congress

From my travel blog: One of those times when travel and my profession intersect — a visit to the Library of Congress in Washington DC!

Travel on the Side

Arguably one of the most beautiful buildings in Washington DC is the Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson building, located across from the US Capitol and next to the Supreme Court.

I was in Washington, DC for a short trip–I had been once in elementary school and once in high school–but neither time had I been to the Library. Now as a librarian, I had to rectify that with a visit!

The Library of Congress functions as the de facto national library of the United States, although its main mission is to serve as a research library for the US Congress. It also serves as the legal deposit for materials published in the United States.

Originally housed in the US Capitol building, the expanding collection of the Library of Congress moved to what is now known as the Thomas Jefferson building in 1897–built specifically for the library.

The Thomas Jefferson building

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