Voting: Information is Power!

Election season in the U.S. is dragging along. I feel like we’re always in a perpetual election cycle. All the news channels have that incessant election countdown box: 20 days, 19 days, 18 days…

Make it stop!

This year, staff at the library where I work at have been trained by the city clerk’s office to register voters. This has been an amazing civic experience. I work with college students; many are first-time voters.

There’s something different about this election year (understatement, much?).

We have registered so many more voters this time around. As soon as I would sit back down at my desk, a student worker would come and get me to register a new voter. Not a complaint, by the way! We ended up setting up a registration table in our lobby for the first time…one new voter after another!

One potential voter walked by and said:

I don’t know who to vote for. I don’t like politics. Who are you voting for?

My first reaction:

Really, I thought:

How could you not know? Based on the issues that are important to you, isn’t there a candidate that interests you?

But not everyone is tied into all the issues. And politics can be a downright turnoff for most people.

The first thing I did, was keep my mouth shut (as hard as it might be!). I’m not telling people on the job who I’m voting for. Politics, like religion, is your own personal business.

I just told the person:

I’m not going to share my personal political opinion because in this situation I’m not here to advocate. I’m here to simply provide information. 

I provided the person with a link to our Election/Voting libguide:

Election/Voting LibGuide

Election/Voting LibGuide

Then I directed the person to a few sites that might help them figure things out:

As much as I would like to bring voters over to my side, that’s not part of my job in this scenario. I can, however, give them the tools to make an educated decision.

Young voters, in particular, get derided for lack of knowledge. I’m guilty of thinking like that too. But throughout our voter registration drive I’ve seen many interested and engaged young people. It makes me feel better the future.

And I need something to feel good about in this election.

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Children’s Books that Presidential Candidates Need to Read

Children’s books aren’t immune to politics. Many deal with issues that children need to learn about. The Lorax is a good example as a modern fable for protecting the environment. Other books have a left/right divide: In If You Give a Mouse a Cookie is it better to be generous, or are we just “enabling”? Evidently it has generated political discussion.

I was doing some work in our Curriculum Materials Collection, when I pulled this book off the shelf:

The Chickens Build a Wall, by Jean-Francois Dumont. Translated into English and published by Eerdmans in 2013, Dumont tells the story of hedgehog that appeares in the barnyard. Chickens, under the leadership of the rooster, decide to build a wall to keep out other “foreign” and unknown things.

As a read this, I immediately thought of the U.S. presidential campaign–and one candidate in particular, Donald Trump. Then I thought, what about if I assigned children’s books to each of the major presidential candidates?

Here’s my take on it. Some of it humorous, some serious.

Donald Trump, please read:

chickensbuildawall

The Chickens Build a Wall – written and illustrated by Jean-Francois Dumont
Summary: Chicken freak out over an hedgehog. Decide to build a wall.
Why?: Incendiary rhetoric from the candidate.
Lesson: Don’t be xenophobic.

mymouthisavolcano

My Mouth is a Volcano – written by Julia Cook, illustrated by Carrie Hartman
Summary: A children’s lesson on not interrupting.
Why?: Candidate never seems to stop talking.
Lesson: Respect others; listen, don’t interrupt.

Hillary Clinton, please read:

waitingisnoteasy

Waiting is Not Easy – by Mo Willems
Lesson: Sometimes you just have to wait.
Why?: Candidate was presumed front-runner in 2008. Presumed front-runner in 2016.
Lesson: Duh. Waiting is not easy!

doug-dennis

Doug-Dennis and the Flyaway Fib – by Darren Farrell
Summary: A little fib can really escalate.
Why?: Candidate could solve a lot of political and personal issues by simply being truthful and transparent.
Lesson: Honesty is the best policy.

Bernie Sanders, please read:

the-chocolate-war

The Chocolate War – by Robert Cormier
Summary: The pressure one can face when not conforming.
Why?: Candidate stays true to his convictions, but can he compromise when needed to get things done?
Lesson: Taking on the establishment doesn’t always pan out.

thepromisebook

The Promise – written by Nicola Davies, illustrated by Laura Carlin
Summary: Young girl snatches an old woman’s purse. The woman asks her to keep a promise of what’s inside. The girl doesn’t find money, but acorns.
Why?: Candidate promises a lot. Results are not often immediate.
Lesson: Deeds, not words.

Ted Cruz, please read:

charweb

Charlotte’s Web – written by E.B. White
Summary: Unlikely barnyard friends.
Why?: Patrol Muslim communities? Dissing single moms? Candidate has a serious “empathy” deficit.
Lesson: Be a friend, not a foe.

eachkindness

Each Kindness – written by Jacqueline Woodson
Summary: Rarely do you get a second chance at kindness. So be kind from the start.
Why?: Candidate’s rhetoric seems overly mean.
Lesson: Your actions influence others. Don’t be a bully.

Need more suggestions on children’s books that teach life lessons? Check out: