Come work with me! Electronic Resources/Systems Librarian

Note from Joe: This position has been filled. Thanks!


We’re hiring!

Carroll University in Waukesha, Wisconsin is looking for a full-time Electronic Resources/Systems Librarian. Details are on the university’s employment site.

About the Electronic Resources/Systems Librarian
The person in this position will be responsible for the overall management, access, and assessment of the library’s electronic resources, discovery layer, integrated library system, and proxy server. We use Sierra as our ILS and and implemented OCLC WDS for our discovery layer in Fall 2019. There will also be opportunities to help shape the library’s policies, programs, and outreach on topics such as open access and OER.

All professional librarian positions participate in the library’s liaison program for assigned subject areas (research assistance, information literacy sessions, and collection development) and share in teaching information literacy sessions for the first-year general education program. We have a budget for professional development. This usually gives each of the librarians the opportunity to attend/travel to one large national conference per year or multiple smaller regional/state conferences. Librarians are administrative staff. Publishing, presenting, and research are not required, but encouraged and supported during your work time.

Todd Wehr Memorial Library, Carroll University

Todd Wehr Memorial Library, Carroll University

About Carroll University
Carroll University has approximately 3,400 students in undergraduate and graduate programs. The university has a strong focus in health & life science programs, but with a grounding in the liberal arts. The library employs 5 professional librarians, 3 support staff members, 5 part-time evening/weekend staff, and approximately 50 student workers. The library prides itself on a team environment.

Carroll University

Carroll University

About Waukesha, Wisconsin
Waukesha (pop. 70,000+) was recently named most livable city in Wisconsin. It is located 20 minutes from downtown Milwaukee (with a metro pop. of 1.5 million), one hour from Madison, and two hours from Chicago.

Downtown Waukesha, WI

Downtown Waukesha, WI

 

Stop Thinking So Much Like a Damn Librarian (or how I started liking discovery layers)

Search@UW

My library just implemented a discovery layer – Primo from Ex Libris (branded as Search@UW since most campuses in the University of Wisconsin System are using it) – to combine catalog records, plus articles and other resources from our databases. Frankly, I wasn’t excited about it at first. It had nothing to do with the product itself. It just seemed like we were getting something that we weren’t asking for.

As an instruction librarian, I approach things from a pedagogical standpoint: How will students use it? What will it do for them? I ask a lot of “what ifs.”

While the discovery layer was being tested, I happened to be teaching a semester-long senior-level information science class. As one of our projects, we did some usability testing on Primo. Guess what? The students loved the discovery layer.

We compared finding information it in versus searching the online catalog and databases separately. The discovery layer won hands down in terms of speed and ease of use. My biggest worry: “Were students finding relevant information?” was assuaged.

And this is when I had to teach myself to STOP THINKING SO MUCH LIKE A DAMN LIBRARIAN!

The discovery layer makes perfect sense to students:

  • A seamless experience for finding information.
  • A simple search interface, a la Google.
  • Start with a broad search and then narrow it to particular types of items (books, articles, etc.).
  • An element of exploration.

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Don’t Box Me In!

Silo-ing information – which libraries are REALLY good at (…and which is NOT a compliment by the way) – does not make sense to students. A catalog to search for books? The databases to search for articles? It’s a holdover from the olden days of libraries: “real” card catalogs with endless drawers of records to locate books in the stacks, and volume after volume of print indexes to find articles in a periodical.

While we were testing the discovery layer, there were a few things I didn’t like. Case in point: In our “old” catalog, I had a drop down box to limit my searching to our Reference Collection. The discovery layer did not have that option from the main menu. But there I went again: thinking like a librarian! Stop. Examine what your users need to do with the tool at hand. Do my students need an option on the main menu to search for reference books? The answer is a resounding NO! Searching for reference books is simply NOT a priority. It’s OK to re-evaluate those sacred cows.

At the same time, I recognize that if you’re doing heavy duty research in a particular subject area, then a subject-specific database is your best bet. So, I created a guide for students: What Tool Should I Use to Find Information? to direct them to the appropriate tools.

Permanent Beta is OK

We rolled out our discovery layer in a not-quite-perfected state. Each class and group I’ve shown it to has loved it. Librarians get too pre-occupied with perfecting everything before rolling it out. This causes delays for your users and dwindling interest as well. Seize your patrons’ needs and desires and then deliver in a timely manner. Get feedback, re-tool, adapt, and grow from there.

The User is #1

So I came around on the discovery layer. While I always like to think I have my patrons’ needs in mind, you really need to step out of those librarian loafers and examine them. There are services that patrons would like, and probably some that they couldn’t even imagine. Harness this information and then deliver it for your patrons.