Small(er) Academic Libraries: Highlights from the Field

This week I visited the local MLIS program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Information Studies. The instructor of the Academic Libraries course invited me to present about working in smaller academic libraries–a career I have thoroughly enjoyed! Below are my slides and notes.

It was a pleasure talking with the students and their instructor!

Slide1

Small(er) Academic Libraries: Highlights from the Field

  • I’ll tell you a little bit about myself and Carroll University’s library.
  • We’ll do a quick comparison between a small academic library and large academic library.
  • Then the bulk of the presentation will discuss highlights of working in a smaller academic library.

Slide2

A Little Bit About Me

  • BA in history from Ball State University.
    • Changed my major a few times.
    • Starting my freshman year of college, I began as a library student worker.
    • I saw the work that the librarians were doing. They enjoyed their jobs and by senior year I knew this was what I wanted to do.
  • After my bachelor’s degree I got my MLS from Indiana University.
  • Been working as an academic librarian for 16 years now.
  • During most of this time, I’ve been an information literacy and reference librarian.
  • Also spent time working as an instructional technologist – helping faculty integrate e-learning tools into their courses.
  • Worked at 5 different universities and have been at Carroll University now for 5+ years. 
  • While at Carroll, I decided to go back to school and completed my master’s degree in education.
    • It wasn’t a job requirement. Did it for professional development.
    • For me, my MLS was all about library content (books, journals, databases).
    • But to me, libraries are all about people!
    • The master’s in education was a good connection between people and content.
    • Did my research on makerspaces in academic libraries.
  • I hate the question: “Where do you see yourself in 5 years?” because I’m not a person who plots out a career trajectory–it’s just not me. I’ve always been more interested in making sure I like what I do and feel supported and valued at work instead of wanting to hold a particular job.
  • Being library director is still new (less than 2 years) and something I never intended or thought of.
    • Especially when you work in a smaller library, you have to be prepared to step up.
    • When our previous director left, none of the other librarians wanted to serve as interim director, so I agreed to.
    • Eventually I interviewed and became permanent library director.

Slide3

A Little Bit About Carroll University

  • We are Wisconsin’s oldest university. Founded in 1846. 
  • Still primarily a residential campus. Around 3,400 students.
  • Focus is on undergraduate education, but growing graduate programs: Doctor of Physical Therapy, MBA, masters in education, masters in occupational therapy, masters in nursing, masters in exercise science, masters in physician assistant studies, masters in athletic training.
  • About 60% of our students major in the health sciences or life sciences. Popular majors are: Exercise Science, Business, Nursing, Biology, and Psychology.

Slide4

Library by the Numbers

  • Above are some statistics about Carroll University’s library.

Slide5

Small Academic Library vs. Big Academic Library: A Comparison

  • A comparison between Carroll University’s library and UW-Milwaukee’s library.

Slide6

What is a Small Academic Library?

  • No straightforward definition.
  • Generally less than 5,000 students.
  • Overall, I would say a total staff of less than 15 to 20.
  • Comparing resources (like number of books, databases) is harder because it depends if the university is part of a system or consortium.
  • So I primarily look at the number of students and number of library staff members. But your mileage may vary.

Slide7

Flat Organizational Structure

  • Smaller academic libraries generally have a flat organizational structure.
  • Not a lot of hierarchy–simply because there’s less staff.
  • As a smaller library, communication is fairly informal as we see everybody almost every day.
    • The library staff meets formally as a group every other week to share what’s going on.
    • The librarians meet formally as a group when needed. 
    • I meet formally with each of my direct reports once a month. It’s a chance to get updated on projects and to share things one-on-one.
    • We generally don’t handle library business by committee unless it’s for a job search.
    • We currently only have one committee: marketing and outreach.

Slide8

Carroll University Library Organizational Structure

  • Each of our librarians coordinates a specific area of the library.
    • Public/Technical Services Librarian & Archivist: technical services and archives.
    • Teaching & Learning Librarian: research assistance and information literacy.
    • Electronic Resources Librarian/Systems Librarian: back-end systems.
    • Life & Health Sciences Librarian: serves our life/health sciences students because we have so many. Needed a dedicated position.
    • And I coordinate access services (Circ, ILL, reserves) in addition to being library director.
  • I report to the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs. I meet with him formally every other week and then all of the deans/directors in Academic Affairs meet together formally once a month.
  • Most smaller and a lot of larger academic library directors report to the Academic Affairs side of the university. The exceptions are some academic libraries, both large and small, that work under a merged Library/Information Technology structure and then the library reports to a person who often holds a title like Vice President and Chief Information Officer.  

Slide9

Public Facing

  • Regardless of your job title, every library staff person at a small institution is public facing. We have direct contact and interactions with students, faculty, and staff everyday.
  • No one sits in a “back room” — and that’s not a criticism of larger institutions. It’s just daily work life at a smaller institution.  
  • For example, our technical services librarian and our electronic resources librarian – job titles that are often considered “back of the house” – participate in teaching information literacy sessions, provide research assistance, and other library liaison duties.
  • At a smaller residential campus, face-to-face is key. That’s why students choose to go college there.

Small(er) Academic Libraries (1)

You Wear a Lot of Hats

  • For me, one of things I’ve loved about working in smaller academic libraries is that there is never a chance to get bored.
  • Because our staff is small, we do a lot of different things.
  • I’m the library director, but all of us do a lot of things.
    • I oversees access services. Each of our librarians coordinates a specific area of the library.
    • I’m also a liaison to several academic departments on campus. Each of our librarians is assigned to departments to liaise with.
    • I teach in the information literacy program and provide research assistance.
  • Generally, Library Directors at larger institutions wouldn’t do much information literacy or research assistance.
    • I do. I want to see the issues that our students and faculty are experiencing first-hand. And frankly, if I didn’t participate in research assistance and teaching information literacy sessions, it would be too burdensome for the rest of the staff.

Slide11

Other Duties as Assigned?

  • The next thing I pulled here is a job description so you can see the examples of wearing many hats.
  • Last summer, we hired for our Teaching & Learning Librarian position–what a lot of academic libraries refer to as a Reference & Instruction Librarian.
  • I’ve highlighted the different “hats” that this librarian wears.
  • Variety is key in smaller academic libraries.
  • Also wanted to share this because when you are job hunting, don’t be intimidated at what at first glance looks like a laundry list of job duties. It looks daunting, but remember we’re smaller, so you’re not devoting as much time to each individual bullet point as you might at a larger institution. Apply! We need you!

Slide12

Generalists vs. Specialists

  • Speaking of job titles. We can talk about the differences between generalists and specialists.
  • For the most part, in small academic libraries, we’re all generalists when it comes to subject matters and library expertise. We know a little bit about a lot of things.
  • At larger academic libraries, of course, you have generalists, but you also have specialists too.
  • On the left are librarian job titles from Carroll.
  • On the right are some examples of job titles I’ve pulled from large academic libraries like UW-Milwaukee, UW-Madison, and the University of Minnesota.

Slide13

Less Roadblocks, but Less Resources

  • One of the outcomes of a flat organizational structure is less red tape. This is one of things I enjoy about working in smaller academic libraries.
  • If I have an idea, or if another staff member has an idea–as long as it’s low cost, you can try it. If it’s a success–then great, but if it fails, that’s OK too since it’s a learning process. I like to promote the idea of always operating in beta mode.  
    • Example: I was meeting with the library’s marketing committee and somehow we got onto the topic of how we noticed that some of our student workers skip meals or were out of meal swipes.
    • The conversation then moved on to how many of our college students are food insecure.
    • So on a whim we decided to convert an unused book tower display into the campus’s first food pantry.
    • There was no red tape or approval process we had to go through. We’re a small campus, so we know what services are provided–so we just decided to do it.
    • Another example: I supervise our Circulation Manager and we were talking about library fines. Recent studies have shown that library fines aren’t necessarily a good way to get library materials returned. So we did away with library fines. Again, no committee. No having to go up the “food chain” to get things approved. We just did it.
  • The flip side? Less resources.
    • So it’s just Carroll. We’re not part of a system or consortium.
    • We need to have most of the services and resources of a larger academic library, but scaled down to our size.  
    • Example: For library databases, we rely a lot upon databases that are provided to us for free (though paid by taxpayers) by Badgerlink, though the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
    • Then we pay for specialized databases to support specific programs at Carroll.

Slide14

Typical Day?

  • Well there is no “typical” day.
  • That’s not unique just to smaller academic libraries, I think larger academic libraries experience that too.
  • Some of it is just dictated by the cyclical nature of the academic calendar.
  • Here is my calendar for Wednesday of last week.
    • Walk through: We have mostly movable furniture now. I like to see how students have been using it and I like to return everything to its original location so we can start fresh each day.
    • Monthly meetings w/ my direct reports.
    • Taught an information literacy session for the required English composition/writing course that first-year students take.
    • The university is embarking on a new audience & degree program, so there was a campus meeting. Important units like the library, the learning commons, academic advising, the registrar’s office, and financial aid have been meeting regularly to plan an outline for student services.
    • Lunch is always blocked, whether it actually happens or not!
    • Library staff is testing a discovery layer. So our Electronic Resources Librarian hosted a session where we did sample searching and asked questions about search results, etc.
    • I have some open time in the afternoon where I can catch up on email, work on projects, etc…
    • Also when I’m at my desk, just like all of the other librarians, we are logged into the library chat program so we can take questions. About 1 in 6 research questions comes through library chat now. So it’s important that we have multiple people staffing it.
    • Then my day wrapped up with campus emergency planning meeting. I left work at 4pm.
  • As far as smaller academic libraries: Here’s an example:
    • Today when I opened up at 7:30am, I noticed that the door handle to one of the library front doors had fallen off. So the first thing I did was to do a Facilities work order to have it fixed.
    • Then when I did my walk through, I noticed tables in our group study rooms had not been cleaned. So I had to file a Janitorial work order.
    • At larger academic libraries, there’s often a staff member who might do this. At a smaller academic library, it’s you!

Slide15

Who Are We Here For: Students or Faculty?

  • This headline is misleading because it’s not really one or the other.
  • The difference though: Carroll University, and most smaller colleges/universities are teaching-focused–primarily at the undergraduate level. We’re not a large research university like UW-Madison or the University of Illinois or University of Michigan which supports faculty and graduate student research.
  • Our mission at a smaller institution is much more tied directly to the undergraduate curriculum.
  • Here is our mission: “The library services students by providing access to information, maintaining an environment that promotes a culture of academic excellence, offering instruction that fosters scholarship, integrity and independent intellectual growth, and the sophisticated information skills necessary for lifelong learning.”
  • The question we ask ourselves: How can we support students in a particular course?
  • We’re not as focused on supporting faculty research, though we do help when we can.

Slide16

Management Skillz

  • In a smaller academic library, you may find yourself managing student workers or library staff. Even as a first job out of your MLIS program.
  • Don’t expect much formal training.
  • Remember, if you’re at a smaller academic library, then other departments on campus will be small too. Like Human Resources, for example. They may not have a lot of time to conduct workshops on manager training. You are kind of left to fend for yourself.
  • Regardless of whether you are a manger or not, everyone in a smaller academic library has to be a leader. Each of us have a portfolio we are responsible for. 
  • Importance of being a team player: In a small academic library, if someone is not a team player it’s immediately noticeable. It can negatively impact public-facing library services.

Slide17

Why Smaller Academic Libraries?

  • To wrap up:
  • #1: You are here for the students. Without them, the university ceases to exist.
  • #2: You see the impact first-hand: I get to see those light-bulb moments when working with students. And that’s really memorable for me. At small place, everyone gets to know you.
  • #3: Variety of job duties – no chance to get bored!
  • #4: Less silo-ing: You really have the chance to collaborate with people from across campus.

Slide18

Marketing and Advocating for the Academic Library

I was asked to give a presentation for university faculty and staff on marketing and advocating for the library. Below are slides and my notes. This presentation was geared towards an external (non-librarian) audience.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library

I have been asked to speak about marketing and advocating for the academic library.

  • We will walk through how I define marketing and advocacy along with their similarities and differences.
  • I’ll also provide examples of how marketing and advocacy can and should be applied in an academic library context.
  • I’ll wrap up with how marketing and advocacy fits into some trends I’m seeing with libraries and higher education.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-2

Before we get into it, I want to share my working definitions of marketing and advocacy. The two go hand-in-hand, but there are some differences.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-3

Marketing

Marketing focuses on the library’s current users and also our potential users. For us here at the university, that’s primarily going to be our students, but also faculty and staff, and community users.

It’s also important to recognize different segments our community. For students: it could be undergraduates, graduate students, international students, athletes, a particular major, etc.

For faculty: It could be marketing to their needs or using them as a channel to market library services to students.

For staff: It could be marketing library services like our leisure reading collection or curriculum materials collection. Something that adds value to their university employment.

The goal: Aligning the needs of the our students, faculty, and staff to the library’s services and resources.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-4

Advocating

Advocating is different. It’s all about the influencers and how the library reaches out to them. It’s focused on the individuals or groups that can influence the environment to benefit the library.

In our case, this would naturally include the Provost and senior leadership, possibly the Board too. With all the changes at the university, the library needs to communicate the value we provide to the University.

Influencers are not just top leadership of a university, but it could also be student organizations like Student Senate. The people here may not even use the library (like senior leadership), but they are the ones to make decisions. That’s why we need to advocate using the data and stories we collect to prove our case for the library.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-5

Marketing & Advocacy

So how do marketing and advocacy go hand in hand to create a better library?

Marketing can:

  • Increase the number of users of library services and resources
  • Shape services to meet the needs and wants of users
  • Ensure the understanding of the role of the library within the institution
  • Help users to understand the unique value of the library (Google paywall vs. library databases)

Advocacy can:

  • Increase decision-makers’ understanding of the library
  • Increase decision-makers’ understanding of the benefits to the institution of a strong sustainable library
  • Support changes in policy that will add to the library’s success

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-6

So before I talk about why marketing and advocacy are an essential part of a library staff’s work, I want to do a little activity. 

Close your eyes. Think about a library.

What’s in there? What do you see? Who do you see?

Open your eyes. Use the scrap paper to write down FIRST 5 things you think of when you hear the word “LIBRARY.”

[discussion follows]

I did a similar activity like this, but a very different audience. Last year, I was asked to give a presentation to a group of high school students who were in a pre-college program. As potential university students I thought it might be interesting to get their take on libraries. So I asked them:

When you hear the word librarian, list five things you think of.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-7

So what did we get? Some of the usual stereotypes: books, old lady, mean, shhhh, and glasses.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-8

Then I switched the question to:

List five things you think a librarian does.

Here I got: read, shelving books, checking in books, help people find materials, and doing programs for the community.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-9

Perception Issue

We have a perception issue in terms of what librarians do. It’s very book-centric and focused on a lot of clerical tasks. Above is one of my favorite slides:

What our parents think we do, What our friends think we do, What students think we do, WHAT WE ACTUALLY DO

Now I’m not going to draw conclusions based on working with one high school group, but it’s a little anecdote that I think is worth sharing.

To me, libraries ARE NOT ABOUT THE BOOKS, THEY ARE ABOUT THE PEOPLE – and that’s what we need to market & advocate to.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-10

Marketing & Advocacy

So marketing and advocacy are an essential part of an academic library staff’s work. As we’ve seen, many people have a stereotyped image of libraries based on outdated experiences. We need to update the image of libraries, librarians, and all library staff. We have a responsibility to promote our professionalism and value to everyone. This is particularly necessary in the current environment of technological change.

Decision makers routinely deal with issues like funding cuts and accountability questions and so much more that impact library services. We need to provide a quick response so that their opinions can be informed by professional advice.

Let’s face it: There is intense competition for funding and we must continue to ensure that the value of the library is well-understood and appreciated so that there is a good reason to continue funding it.

To do that, we need to back up our marketing and advocacy with data and stories. And now I’m going to talk about a few of those examples.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-11

Low Key Assessment

One less time intensive project that I like is from library at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis. It’s a simple Post-It Note wall. It asks students:

“What do you love about the library?”

“What do you hate about the library?”

It’s an easy way for students to give feedback and an easy way for the library to listen. It keys library staff into unmet needs or services. As an assessment tool, it tells us what we’re doing well and what we could improve on. We could take the a data from the post-it notes to advocate for library improvements or resources.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-12

Library as a Place

In the past ten years or so, there has been a focus on promoting the Library as a Place – on a college campus, that sort of makes the library like the living room. You want to have various spaces in the library that appeals to all types of students. So collecting student data in how they use the library is essential in arguing for additional resources for library improvements.

One example I have here is from a team of researchers, mostly from Drexel University, where librarians started to taking NOT just hourly building counts, but actually SEAT counts–and recording which spaces students were using. Then they devised a heatmap to show where students were congregating. Red/orange/yellow is higher use, blue/green is lower use.

In the left example, students were using solo/pairs tables by the windows. In the right example, students were using the computer pods in the middle.

So based off of this data, library administration could go to senior leadership in proposing renovations or improvements based on space. In today’s data-driven higher ed environment, you need to use the numbers to prove your story.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-13

“Just in Time” Marketing

Another idea I like are these “Library Minute” videos from Arizona State University. Designed for “just in time” help, these videos market library services and resources. It’s a good way to reach current and potential users. They are short: around one minute as the title suggests. Videos can be embedded on the library’s website, their Research Guides, and can be promoted by the university or the library via social media. They have a whole list of short videos: how to access online resources, how to get materials through Interlibrary Loan, and even more complicated issues like open access.

kindness-1197351_1920

Kindness Audit

This is another concept I love because it’s undercover marketing to students, but it also gives you data that you can use to advocate for the library. I first heard about in a MOOC I took with Michael Stephens at San Jose State University. 

So what is it? This is an idea that I adopted here. I started with new library student workers, but I also recommend tapping the broader student body. 

I asked students to use their smartphone camera and walk through the library and take photos of:

  • Things you liked
  • Things you didn’t like
  • Things that confuse you
  • Things that surprise you

The goal: Have students assess the library’s physical space to see how “kind” it is. The students find out new things on their own as they explore the library. Library staff can use the data to improve the space.

We used the Kindness Audit data to:

  • Convert our gendered, single-stall restrooms, into gender-neutral restrooms.
  • Add more electrical outlets.
  • Create collaborative open study in the Library Classroom when not being used for a class session.
  • Liberalize the library’s food & drink policy.

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A Sense of Fun

I also think we should market social events that help change that stuffy perception of the academic library. Encourage some fun events, get students involved, and then when they actually need research help they will feel comfortable coming back. Here I’ve been involved with our welcome parties that we did for a couple of years. When I worked at my previous institution, I instituted an Edible Book Contest for National Library Week which was fun.

This past January, we hosted laser tag in the Library, which I loved:

  • Required little time and no money from the library
  • Was sponsored by Student Activities who coordinated the staffing
  • I was happy to offer up our space for the event
  • Creates goodwill among the students
  • It would have been easy to say “No” but I want to create that culture of saying yes and showing the Library off in a different light.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-17

Trends

So I’m a person who always like to see things on the horizon. So I want to talk a little bit about some trends I’m seeing in higher ed and how library marketing and advocacy will be key.

Marketing and Advocating for the Library-18

Open Educational Resources

This is something that is both marketing to Faculty, and being an advocate for Students. I’m concerned about the rising cost of textbooks. Students already pay a lot for college and this doesn’t help. I think the Library should be marketing to faculty the use of open educational resources.

OERs are freely available, open licensed textbooks, media, and other digital materials that can be used in the Classroom. There is a lot of high quality content out there, it’s just making the time to search for it and figure out how it might fit into the curriculum that takes time.

The library could host a workshop with faculty in discovering and evaluating resources such as these and maybe start a pilot program where a few faculty members experiment with them in their courses.

To me OER fits squarely within the university ethos with respect to stewardship of material resources and would be beneficial for our students.

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Scholarly Communication

This one primarily affects Faculty. The cost of journals continue to rise beyond inflation each year and they are now owned by a small number of multinational publishing conglomerates which can jack up the prices. I think the library should be marketing open access journals to faculty and advocating for university support for faculty to publish in them.

I wish we could encourage faculty to consider publishing in reputable open access journals (those that provide free access online and are non-profit). However, it’s a balance because those faculty members going up for tenure want to publish in a high-profile journal and those still tend to be owned by those large scholarly publishers.

The library should develop some sort of award or prize for faculty publishing in an open access journal. We do get questions from faculty asking for help in identifying journals to publish in, so maybe some sort of workshop or brown bag is in order. But I think it’s the library’s job to promote and advocate for this.

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Experiential Learning

This involves both students and faculty. Usually the library is thought of as a one way transaction: You download a journal article or you check out a book. I would like the library to be a place where students create things. So maybe that’s a makerspace that combines art & technology skills, but I would love to connect with faculty and students on something like this.

For example: We have a 3D printer, but there’s no educational programming done. People submit their jobs to the library and we print their items. If we could design a space that is collaborative and market it to faculty and students as a place to experiment and create things and talk about what we’re doing and what we are learning, that would great. To me, that places the library in the forefront of not just being a repository of THINGS, but a place that CREATES things–and I think that sends a powerful message to campus.

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Marketing & Advocacy

So to wrap-up…

These days everyone’s attention is so segmented. The academic library cannot just expect to exist as it is. We need to reach out to our current and potential users and promote our services and resources. We also need to investigate the unmet needs of our users and figure out: WHAT ARE WE NOT DOING THAT WE SHOULD BE DOING? In doing so, it’s important for the library collect data and stories from our users to paint a picture for senior leadership. The goal is to create a funded library that serves our community of users.

The Accidental Library Director

If you would have told me just over a year ago that I would be a library director, hysterical laughter would be my response:

But here I am. I keep calling myself the “accidental” library director. That’s how I introduced myself with a group of new college library director peers. My husband told me to stop saying that. “You’re devaluing your worth!” or something to that effect. I can’t help it. Midwestern self-deprecation is my coping mechanism. No one should seem too self-important.

There was never a desire for a career in library leadership. Up until now, my entire 15+ year stretch as an academic librarian has been focused on information literacy, research assistance, and outreach. I got to do “fun” things like 3D printing, managing a children’s/young adult literature collection, teaching a podcasting course, and designing active learning exercises. I had the freedom to be as creative as I wanted to be.

Conversely, being library director sounded like a creativity killer: budgets, human resources, management.

But truth be told, I was inching toward leadership: I had plenty of programmatic leadership experience, and in the past few years also managed staff.

In October 2017, the interim library director at our small-ish academic library (approx. 3,400 students) resigned. We did not have a back up plan. That’s not a criticism–we just all had too many other things to do. Succession planning was not at the top of the list.

After realizing that none of the other librarians wanted to step up, I offered to. I also told the Provost that I was not interested in the job permanently. Well, you can see where that went: Accidental Library Director.

I filled the interim role for 6 months before applying for the permanent position. Even though an internal applicant, I still had to go through the full interview process: resume/cover letter, phone interview, in-person interview. And I’m glad I did: it made the process transparent and worthwhile. In May 2018, I was appointed permanent library director.

Why Didn’t I Want to Do It (at first)?

  1. I like being a front line librarian and the interactions and energy with students, faculty, and staff.
  2. We had no one trained as a #2 person who could step up to the top role.
  3. At our small-ish academic library, the library director also oversees access services (circulation, interlibrary loan, reserves) and I had absolutely no interest in that.
  4. I really enjoyed my coordination area of info lit and research assistance. My office in the Information Commons was a hub for student activity. I would miss that.
  5. I wasn’t sure I was the right person to be an effective advocate for the library with senior administration (cue imposter syndrome).

Why Did I Change My Mind?

  1. As director, I’m still a front line librarian! At a smaller institution, all of the librarians are front line. I may not be doing as much info lit as I did previously, but I have plenty of interactions. I just worked with a senior capstone English class and their outstanding research topics have energized me as reference librarian this semester.
  2. I got over my “I hate access services” feeling. We all have job duties that are not our “favorite.” You sometimes just have to suck it up. I’m backed up by an incredible circulation manager who handles a lot of day-to-day access services issues.
  3. Yeah, I did enjoy info lit over the years (and I still happily participate as library director–I just don’t have to do as much). But secretly, I was getting to the point where I could potentially see myself getting burnt out. It was time for a change. I got to re-write my “old” position description and hire a new Teaching & Learning Librarian who is off to an outstanding start!
  4. It took some non-library people to convince me to apply: a professor, a senior administrator, and a staff member to say: “Joe: You could TOTALLY do this job!” For me, I gradually realized that all of my experiences prepared me for this. My feelings transitioned from “I could do the job” to “I want to do this job.”
  5. In the interim role, I started making small changes. Then I wanted to see those changes develop. Library administration is not boring. I love collaborating with colleagues from inside and outside the library. I’m proud of the exciting things that library staff are doing. I want to promote that and work with stakeholders on carrying out the library’s mission of student success.

With that said, there is so much to learn and you can be pulled in a million different directions. It’s a big switch for me. For the first year, I’ve been doing a lot of listening: amongst library staff, students, and faculty on campus. I’ve been energized in interactions with the College Library Director Mentoring Program and some of my professional associations and by great colleagues on Twitter.

In a few months, I’ll run a follow-up post on what I’m learning. Lately, it’s been mostly HVAC issues, hah!

Academic Librarian: Week in the Life

TL;DR: Librarians do a lot of different things.

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“I love books, too!”

By now, most librarians are used to that response when someone asks what they do. To be honest, as an academic librarian, I rarely do readers’ advisory. I would probably break out into a cold sweat if someone asked me for the next great mystery or romance to read. In fact, you should probably take away my librarian card because I don’t often read for “fun” in this stage of my life–it usually ebbs and flows.

My favorite response to what people think I do was when I was taking grad classes for my master’s in education through my place of employment. During one class session we were asked to go up to the whiteboard for an interactive exercise. One of my classmates said:

“Send Joe up to the board. He’s probably a good speller since he reads all day at his job.”

Ouch! I didn’t let that one go unaddressed.

As an academic librarian, I find that people who even work on campus in other departments don’t understand what we do. Nope, I’m not the book shelver or the book stamper–unless there’s some sort of emergency or staffing shortage. That’s usually what we train our student workers to do.

So I thought I’d write about what I did last week. In my current position, I am the Reference & Instruction Librarian at a small(ish) academic library. We have a student population of 3,500. Our staff includes 5 FTE librarians, 2.5 FTE support staff, 4 part-time evening/weekend staff, and 50+ student workers.

In terms of general job duties, here what I do:

  • Coordinate the library’s research assistance services. I’m one of two primary “front-line” librarians here for general research help (if it’s subject-specific, the subject librarian for that area will pick it up from here). I’m also usually available for research help from chat when I’m not in a meeting or away from my desk.
  • In charge of scheduling and staffing for the first-year information literacy program. I share in the workload with the other librarians for the program, but end up taking a majority of the info lit sessions since it’s my coordination area.
  • Subject librarian for the education, graduate education, music, psychology, and diversity programs (so research assistance, info lit, collection development).
  • Manage the Curriculum Materials Collection and supervise one student worker.
  • Supervise the Information Commons and Classroom Manager (a support staff position).
  • Supervise the part-time Library Evening/Weekend Supervisors who are responsible for overall management of the building and research assistance during the evenings and weekends.
  • Manage 3D printing services.
  • Design/create social media posts/library graphics.

So it’s kind of a hodgepodge of duties, but that’s what I enormously like about working in a small(ish) academic library. No chance of getting bored!

My “official” workweek is Monday-Friday 8:00am to 4:30pm. Because I work in a “train town” and cross four sets of railroad tracks to get to work, I usually plan to arrive just a bit earlier in case I get stuck at the tracks. Generally, I walk in the library doors around 7:45am.

In outlining what I did for the week, I have color-coded my tasks into five main areas:

  • Research questions or Research for my job = red
  • Info Lit = green
  • Management/Supervisory = blue
  • Technology = purple
  • Marketing, incl. social media = pink

Here’s what I did…

MONDAY

  • Arrived at 7:45am. Went to my office. Logged in to my computer and glanced at my emails to see if anything needed an immediate response.
  • Today the university was hosting a visit from the Higher Learning Commission accreditors. At 8am, I walked through the library to straighten up any furniture/items so that everything was tidy for their visit.
  • 8:15am: Took less than 10 minutes and walked over to the Main Dining Room on campus for the free employee continental breakfast (I usually grab a coffee and banana to go). Hey, I take advantage of all our benefits here! Good way to see colleagues in other departments. I do this most work days.
  • Morning tasks:
    • Start responding to emails, including:
      • Requests from two professors for info lit sessions.
      • Professor looking for full-text of an article.
      • Opened a work order with the I.T. department about students having issues with their printing allotment (printing money).
      • Sent an email to volunteer for a staff committee position.
      • Approved vacation time for a position I supervise.
      • 3D printing request: clarification for more info from the client.
    • Updated the research assistance schedule to fill a couple vacant shifts.
    • Created a social media post on Constitution Day for Facebook and Twitter.
    • Prepped for an infolit session on Tuesday for an education class.
    • Helped a professor who was working in the Info Commons on how to navigate the new course management system.
  • Quick drop-by/chat questions from students…nothing too in-depth. 
  • Lunch from 12-1pm. I have a fishbowl-style office, so make a point of taking my lunch time away from it. I walked over to the Main Dining Room and used one of my meal swipes that faculty/staff can purchase for a discount.
  • Afternoon tasks:
    • Worked on budgeting (Excel stuff) for Spring semester for our Library Evening/Weekend Supervisor shifts.
    • Did a comparison of library hours at peer institutions. I’m using the data to see if I can re-work the budget to possibly extend library hours in the future. Sent info to my supervisor (the Library Director) and set up a meeting to discuss.
    • Developed a training schedule for a new Curriculum Materials Collection student worker position that I share with the Tech Services and Serials areas.
    • Updated the 3D Print Job Queue for the Library Evening/Weekend Supervisors (they run the 3D printer when I’m not here).
  • 3:30pm: Attended an open forum for staff hosted by the accreditation visitors.
  • Got back to my office at 4:15 in time to update the Library Evening/Weekend Supervisor on duty (she works 4pm-Midnight) and see what projects she could work on this evening.
  • Left work at 4:30pm.

TUESDAY

  • Arrived at 7:50am. Logged into my computer and glanced at emails.
  • 8:05am: Main Dining Room for free coffee and a banana. Chatted with a couple colleagues in a different department on campus.
  • Morning tasks:
    • Start responding to emails, including:
      • Asking a professor for her syllabus/assignment info so I could prep for her upcoming info lit class.
      • Professor requesting a “Library Needs Assessment” for two proposed courses (all proposed courses require this. It’s a report that looks at library resources and services to demonstrate we can support the course and possibly argue for more money–although that is rare).
      • Created a Facebook and Twitter post about the library’s interlibrary loan service in conjunction with an article I read from The Chronicle.
  • Research question: Helped a student find advertisements that demonstrate gender roles in different time periods. We used our set of LIFE magazines from the 1950s and compared them with some of our “coffee shop” magazines (Time, People, etc.) from today.
  • The professor I helped chaperone a class with to Italy this past summer, dropped by. Wanted to know if I had a slideshow of pictures I could share with him for a campus “study abroad fair.” Sent him a link to one of my Flickr albums.
  • 11am-12:30pm: Started training a new student worker for the Curriculum Materials Collection.
    • General job duties overview, Library of Congress classification, LC Easy tutorial (wow, that’s old–but it still does the job!), how to shelve materials, gathering a list of display books for me.   
  • Lunch from 12:30pm-1:30pm. Brought leftovers from home and ate in the library’s staff room. Then took a walk outside for the rest of my lunch hour.
  • Quick drop-by/chat questions from students…nothing too in-depth. 
  • 2pm-3:50pm: Info lit session for a 300-level Education class. Students were researching various topics in the scholarly or professional literature. I do little lecturing, preferring a workshop-format where I visit with each student and walk around the room.
  • Updated the Library/Evening Weekend Supervisor on any outstanding issues.
  • Left work at 4:30pm.

WEDNESDAY

  • Arrived at 7:45am. Logged into my computer and glanced at emails.
  • 8:05am: Main Dining Room for free coffee and a banana.
  • Morning tasks:
    • Answer emails.
    • Ran a report on 3D printing usage. 
    • Started a 3D print job for a client.
    • Did a Facebook and Twitter post about the library’s travel books to cross-promote with the campus study abroad fair later that day.
  • Research question from a student: Looking for scholarly articles analyzing the Gospel of Matthew. Normally I would refer student to subject librarian for religion, but she was unavailable.
  • 10-11am: Prepped for an info lit class scheduled for Thursday surrounding the topic of African-American social conditions, injustice, the Black Lives Matter movement, etc. The class is reading The Hate U Give and All American Boys. This class was for one of the first-year Cultural Seminar courses we do info lit for–and that freshmen students are required to take. Each of the 37 sections of the course has library activities customized to the course topic. So, I spent some time researching the topic and formulating a hands-on activity.
  • 11am-12pm: Conference call for the Wisconsin Association of Academic Librarians. I’m on the conference planning committee.
  • 12pm-1pm: Lunch at the Main Dining Room, stopped by the campus bookstore to buy a t-shirt, and then went for a walk for the remainder of my lunch hour.
  • Afternoon tasks:
  • 4:00-4:30pm: Updated the Library Evening/Weekend Supervisor on duty. We worked with the 3D printer.
  • 6pm-6:15pm: Drop-by info lit session for a 300-level psychology class–quick step-by-step on how to find an empirical article from the psychological literature. 
  • Graduate student stopped by just before I was leaving to see how to renew an interlibrary loan book that was overdue (quick answer: you can’t!)–and that one of our books was accidentally returned to the public library in a different city! Yikes! Gave student contact info for the library staff person responsible for dealing with this–and also dashed off a quick email to that person to give a heads-up.
  • Left work at 6:45pm.

THURSDAY

  • Arrived at 7:50am. Logged into my computer and glanced at emails.
  • 8:05am: Main Dining Room for free coffee and a banana.
  • Morning tasks:
    • Answer emails.
    • Get 3D print job started for a client.
  • Research question from a professor on bibliometrics: How can I find out when a specific term became popular in the scholarly literature? How can I track development of this topic over time?
  • 10-11am: Infolit session for 100-level Cultural Seminar class on African-American social conditions, injustice, and Black Lives Matter movement. No lecturing…lots of interactive exercises to get students thinking and using our resources!
  • Research question from a student: Looking for an article to share with classmates for a discussion activity. How have gender roles changed in the United States from 1950s to today?
  • 12pm-1pm: Lunch. Used my faculty/staff meal swipe at the Au Bon Pain on campus. Went for a walk for the remainder of my lunch hour.
  • 1pm-1:30pm: Training with Curriculum Materials Collection student worker. 
  • Worked with the Info Commons/Library Classroom manager on a tech problem. Ended up doing a work order for the campus IT department as we (correctly) suspected some of our public computers did not get re-imaged properly (they were missing Deep Freeze software).
  • 2:30pm-4:15pm: Banned Books Week display. Searched library catalog for books, ran a report with call numbers, retrieved the books with the help of a student worker, changed books’ status in catalog to “On Display,” organized the display and created graphics for it. Ideas for the display came from the Library Think Tank group on Facebook.
  • 4:15pm: Updated the Library Evening/Weekend Supervisor on duty.
  • Left work at 4:30pm.

FRIDAY

  • Came in early at 7:30am since I knew I had an 8:30am meeting. Walked straight over to the Main Dining Room to get my usual coffee and a banana, and then headed to my office.
  • Logged into my computer and started checking email.
    • Heard that one (the only?) non-air conditioned classroom building was positively sweltering in 90 Fahrenheit heat. Emailed some professors over there to see if they wanted to use our Library Classroom for the day (since, for once, we had no info lit sessions scheduled). Several happily took me up on the offer!
  • 8:30am-9:30am: Met with the Library Director and the campus’ Digital Marketing Strategist to preview new library website. Received training for the new web editing software.
  • Troubleshoot 3D printer: A piece of filament broke off inside the plastic feeding tube. Used a metal hangar to push the filament through the remainder of the tube and pliers to pull it out. Genius!
  • Started a 3D print job for a client.
  • Student looking for book…only had e-book copy. Helped student set up an e-book account.
  • Did a quick display for National Hispanic Heritage Month. Searched for books in the library catalog, gathered them, organized a display, and printed some graphics. 
  • Lunch from 12pm-1pm: Used my faculty/staff meal swipe at the Main Dining Room. Used the remainder of my lunch hour to go for a walk.
  • Afternoon tasks:
    • Completed “Library Needs Assessment” reports for two proposed music courses. Sent reports to the professor.
    • Posted to the library’s intranet site to update the Library Evening/Weekend Supervisors on projects to work on.
  • Because I worked a longer day on Wednesday, I left today at 2:30pm.

So that’s my detailed week. It may look like a lot, but I bet if any other librarian outlined their work week, they come up with an equally long (or longer!) list too.

My work is often cyclical, just like the academic year. This was only the second full week of classes here, so in-depth research questions have not yet reached their peak. Info lit is starting to pick up. Usually from this time through the first week in November, I’ll be prepping for and teaching anywhere from 2-6 info lit sessions per week.

I’m surprised how much of it is spent with supervisory/management stuff or tech stuff, but that’s the nature of my job. Would be interested in seeing how it compares to other academic librarians from a cross-section of small to large institutions.

…Oh and I didn’t tell you what didn’t get completed and pushed to the back burner for next week, but that could be a whole other blog post!

No More Cruise Control: Driving Change with Students, Staff, and Space

Last month I gave a presentation at the Wisconsin Association of Academic Librarians conference. I love this conference!–it’s my regional peers, in a small setting, sharing creative and practical tips from their libraries.

Description of the presentation: 
Adapt or die. It’s a mantra we hear, but libraries have always been about change. The key now is to be in the driver’s seat. Librarians from Carroll University will discuss four ways they have embraced change:

1) a workflows assessment to analyze staff duties,

2) a ʺkindness auditʺ to examine barriers to library services,

3) an enhanced patron count to determine how to best utilize library space,

4) a survey to report how students use the library.

Combined, these initiatives position the library as a change maker. Learn about these practices and take the wheel to share your experiences with change, too!

 

I tend not to do the death-by-bullet point PowerPoint, so a little info may be lost outside of the presentation. What it all boils down to are four things my library has done to respond to and anticipate change. Some focus on students and improving library spaces and services, while some focus on staff duties and how to best position the library for the future.

If you have any questions about it, let me know!

 

What is Your Leadership Style? Ask Your Colleagues!

Happy New Year! I’m currently enjoying a brief break from working on my master’s in education before classes start up again in late January. So far, I’ve completed 7 out of 11 courses!

The experience has helped fill in gaps that my master’s in library science lacked — that degree was all about library content (books, journals, databases), but surprisingly lacked anything about people. To me, libraries are *all about people* and that’s been the focus on this master’s in adult and continuing education.

This past semester, one of the courses I enrolled in was a management and leadership course. I don’t often take time to consider my leadership style. I’m a manager, but to me, any employee regardless of supervisory responsibilities can (and should!) be a leader.

Leadership Assignment

One assignment I worked on was a concept paper to examine my leadership style through the perspectives of colleagues and friends and then identify the leadership style of a “famous” person that I wish to emulate:

Use five original quotations from your friends or colleagues on how they see you as a leader: write a 3-page paper 1) describing the leadership you demonstrate in practice, and 2) compare and contrast your personal traits and characteristics with an effective public leader of choice (living or dead).

The text of paper is below.

Leadership Styles

Whenever I take a “find your leadership style” quiz, the result is usually the same: I never fall strongly into one category. So hopefully that means I bring in skills that touch upon multiple styles?

In browsing online for leadership styles, I first read Rooke and Torbert’s (2005) classification of seven leadership styles: Opportunist, Diplomat, Expert, Achiever, Individualist, Strategist, and Alchemist. I was not attracted to this classification, since several of categories indicate a leadership deficit. After doing some Googling, I found that many sites and articles reference the following common styles: Charismatic, Participative, Quiet, Servant, Situational, Transactional, and Transformative (Chen, 2006). I like this schema since it plays to people’s strengths.

Feedback from Colleagues

I wasn’t exactly sure what kinds of quotes I would get about my leadership style when I emailed my co-workers and asked professional colleagues on Facebook. I knew by me asking, I wasn’t likely to get anything critical; this is not an anonymous evaluation or performance review. I actually got “warm fuzzies” from a few of the comments.

I’ll start with the simplest:

“Have fun; it’s just work.”

This was from a current co-worker and I know where she was going with this one: As a leader in a workplace setting that is not life-and-death, I emphasize the “fun” aspect as it goes against the grain of the traditionally stuffy world of libraries. The library should be a creative and expressive place–even noisy, at times. The days of being a silent book warehouse are over. Libraries need to adapt and change.

A former student responded to my plea for quotes via a Facebook post:

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“I always felt that your leadership style suggested ‘one of us’ as opposed to ‘us vs. them.’ As an instructor, I never felt like I was assigned work, but more like I was taking part in something as a group. It was always a pleasure.”

Even before beginning the M.Ed. program, I knew my style was collaborative, but now I know the power of facilitating–I do not desire to be the sage on the stage. Each group member has something worthwhile to share, I like to build relationships with groups to tap into that.

Conversely, a former supervisor described me as:

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The part I focused on was:

“find[ing] it just as easy to do something yourself as to delegate.”

Although I have learned to delegate more in the past few years, I do have a hard time letting go. I have a picture in my head of how something should look and I can be a perfectionist in that regard. However, time has told me that reaching out to get additional perspectives is important and can help improve an idea that I already thought was “perfect.”  

A current co-worker stated:

“I would say you lead by example. You do what needs to be done, you behave in a manner which others seek to emulate, and your work ethic sets the bar for others to meet.”

This seems like common sense to me. I’m a person who likes steps and examples, so that’s my natural leadership style: modeling the way for others. In fact, that’s what frustrates me sometimes as a supervisor: If expectations and examples are laid out clearly, why do we fail?

My current supervisor focused on decision-making:

“Above all else, a leader must be able to commit to making a decision. Joe is capable of making decisive decisions, when needed, even in hectic moments.”

My first thought was, “I’m glad my boss feels that way!” because I don’t always. In my mind, I do a lot of back-and-forth when it comes to decision making (pros and cons, potential outcomes). I also feel strongly that you can also change your mind on decisions if presented with new information. I don’t call that “waffling” or “flip-flopping”: it’s adapting to changing situations.

Rachel Carson: Quiet Leadership

In regards to a leader I admire, I chose environmentalist Rachel Carson (1907-1964). Despite being able to facilitate and engage in transformation, I am, at my core, an introvert. After reading the book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking and watching the author’s TED talk (Cain, 2012), I started thinking about leaders who fall into the introvert category. Carson sticks out to me as a quiet leader. She did serious work that led to lasting change–much of it coming posthumously. She also didn’t seek the limelight.

Koehn (2012) describes Carson as a person “who preferred walking the Maine shoreline to stalking the corridors of power.” That is true of me: I like to get away and be outside. I want time to think about big projects before acting. Like Carson, I’m not a cage rattler, preferring to do my research and influence people with my findings. However, perhaps unlike Carson, I also recognize that a “just the facts” approach won’t work with everyone. You need to weave a story and touch both hearts and minds.  

With Carson, I’m struck by her “no complaints” lifestyle. Her family had financial difficulties putting her through college and was not able to finish her Ph.D. She cared for sick relatives, took in an orphaned family members, and had her own health problems. She often had to put aside her own work to take care of these matters. Work is important, but it’s not everything. I identify with this needed ability to be flexible with life and work.

People equate introverts with shyness. I disagree. Carson used her leadership skills to develop a wide network of associates (government, nonprofits, higher education) to help her with her groundbreaking environmental studies and stood up to the chemical lobby when needed (Koehn, 2012). I admire this ability to use quiet leadership to stand up for your convictions. Rachel Carson’s tenacity combined with modesty, preparation, and problem-solving are qualities I seek to emulate.


Post-Assignment Note

This assignment helped me see my leadership attributes through the eyes of my colleagues. It’s important to step back and see how others view you. In identifying a “famous” person whose leadership style I admire, I was attracted to Rachel Carson’s “quiet” leadership style. Perhaps predictable for a librarian, but a powerful style nonetheless.


References

Cain, S. (2012, February). Susan Cain: The power of introverts

Chen, S-S. (2006). Leadership styles and organization structural configurations. Journal of Human Resource & Adult Learning, 39-46. 

Koehn, N.F. (2012, October 27). From calm leadership, lasting change. The New York Times

Rooke, D., & Torbert, W.R. (2005). Seven transformations of leadership. Harvard Business Review, 83(4), 66-76.