A Meandering Post About Starting My 2nd Masters

Haven’t posted in awhile…time, time, time…you’ll see why below…

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When I started my first academic librarian job in 2003, it was stressed upon me that I needed a 2nd master’s degree. Then that requirement was mysteriously dropped at my workplace. I happily slummed it for the next decade-plus with “just” my MLS (my high school-educated parents were damn proud of that master’s degree…even more so than me).

Unlike some people with a detailed career plan, I’ve meandered from here to there–mostly focused on the position and location.

I’ve never worked at a research institution, nor have I been an in-depth subject expert. My bachelor’s degree is in history, but that was an afterthought and I don’t feel any strong connection to it. So for my interests (YMMV!), the 2nd master’s didn’t matter as much. Never had any academic librarians question it career-wise, but I’m sure I avoided any institutions where a 2nd master’s was required.

However, in the back of my mind, I thought: If the right opportunity would present itself, I would go back and earn that 2nd master’s. But I had a couple of big stipulations:

  1. The degree needed to be in a field that interested me.
  2. I wasn’t willing to pay tuition or take out loans.

For the people who say “you can’t put a price on educationUmm, yes, you can. It’s called your tuition bill. Despite working in higher ed, I had never worked at an institution that offered tuition remission to employees for grad programs.

Now at my current workplace, I have that opportunity and I’m taking advantage of it. I’ve started a master of education in adult and continuing education.

Since becoming a librarian, my specialty has been in information literacy: How do students seek and evaluate information? How do students learn? What barriers prevent them from learning? I also watch students make that transition from high school to college (and become adults in the process)–not to mention non-traditional students with their diverse needs. All of this is a good match for adult and continuing education.

So I’m back in class…formally. First time since 2002 when there was no Facebook, YouTube, or smartphones. I will admit to being intimidated. Do students still take notes on paper? Do I bring my iPad? The answer is yes to both questions.

This semester, I’m taking 2 classes: “Foundations of Adult Education” and “Teaching and Learning Across the Lifespan.” Because this is an education program, the focus has been PEOPLE, PEOPLE, PEOPLE, whereas I felt my MLS focused on CONTENT, CONTENT, CONTENT. In my mind, librarianship should ultimately be the merger of the two.

Thinking back, as someone who has always been a public-facing librarian, I wish I had had more content on educational theory, instructional techniques, group dynamics, and organizational leadership–something that went beyond the two basic classes I took in library school: “Education of Information Users” and “Management and Administration of Libraries.” Although I’ve always kept up professional development-wise: reading articles, attending & presenting at conferences, participating in webinars – I feel like my M.Ed. program is helping to fill in some holes I had. And the course materials? I knew it was good stuff when I saw “information literacy” being bandied about early on in one of my textbooks. Music to my ears!

So I’m going to see if they can teach an old dog new tricks (research says yes, by the way 🙂 ). As a result, I may not be posting here as regularly as I had in the past. Time to hit the books!