How Not to Tweet for Your Library

Twitter is one of the best tools for promoting library services, resources, and programs. Lots of libraries use Twitter well. Check out the New York Public Library, Enoch Pratt Free Library, Kansas City Public Library, and UIUC Undergraduate Library for some good examples.

However, some libraries send out tweets that aren’t particularly welcoming. Some tweets simply do not help in the promotion of library services and resources. Frustrated, I sent out this tweet the other day:

So, how do you avoid being the Twitter equivalent of this library sign? Below are a few guidelines…

No cell phone use in the library!

Image from Flickr, courtesy of Travelin’ Librarian.

Rule #1: Avoid the schoolmarm tweets:

Rule #2: Avoid the “No Food” tweets and other policy tweets.
I understand that some libraries have “no food” policies, but Twitter isn’t the best tool for policy enforcement. It can also make your library sound rather passive aggressive. Here are some examples:

Policy tweets, such as “No Food,” may also confuse users (e.g., differing policies at different libraries):

If you must post a “no food” tweet, here’s a more positive spin:

Rule #3: Instead of negativity, offer suggestions. Here are a few examples that positively address noise issues at libraries:

Rule #4: Try avoiding “Please do not…” tweets. Even if you add “please” – your tweet can still be construed as negative.

Of course, sometimes you need to adjust the rules. Here’s an example of a “Please do not” tweet that would be perfectly acceptable:

Rule #5: Just as with other forms of written communication, you generally want to avoid CAPITAL LETTERS so you are not yelling:

So what other rules would you suggest? Post your comments here!

About these ads

2 thoughts on “How Not to Tweet for Your Library

  1. How else would you recommend informing the students about the library policy?

    • Hi Ames–my thinking is that Twitter is best left to promoting news about the library (events, new books, new resources, tips, etc…), but not necessarily policy decisions and those sorts of things. I would see it as a “turnoff” if a library keeps tweeting reminders about food and noise. If a library has policies like these, then they need to be enforced in person and not handled through social media. However, I’m all for taking what my be perceived as “negative” issues (no food, no cell phones) and turning them into helpful tweets (“Need a quiet place to study, go to…”), etc… Just my dos centavos!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s