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Archive for February, 2012

Yesterday, my library hosted its first Edible Book Festival. With minimal planning and volunteers, we pulled it off. Traditionally, libraries hold an Edible Book Festival on or around April 1, to honor Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, author of Physiologie du gout (The Physiology of Taste), who is generally regarded as an early “foodie”. My library held its event today to honor our 40th anniversary.

If you’ve never planned an Edible Book Festival before, it’s easy to do and it’s a great way to get your community, school, or university involved. Here are a few pointers if you are interested in planning such an event.

  • Look around online for some examples and inspiration: Start with the International Edible Book Festival website. Here are a few libraries and organizations that have hosted an edible book event:
  • Determine categories for the event such as: Best Individual Entry, Best Group Entry, Best in Show, “Punniest,” Most Likely to Be Eaten
  • Help answer the question, What is an Edible Book? by providing an explanation:
    • “Edible books can look like a book in form and shape, be inspired by a book or author, can be a pun of a book title, can refer to a book character, reproduce a book cover, or just have something to do with books in general.”
    • Help people visualize what an edible book can be made from: “Entries may be made from anything that is edible (cake, bread, crackers, Jell-o, fruit, vegetables, candy, etc.) as long as it can sit out for an hour or two without melting, turning bad, or getting scary.”
  • Promotion: Use Facebook, Twitter, and other social media to promote the event. We also created a campus flyer and got a story in our university’s daily email announcement.
  • Reach out to local groups that might be interested in the event (elementary, middle & high schools, restaurants, culinary schools, libraries).
  • We created a Libguide that displayed information for people that might be interested in the event.
  • Some libraries collect an entry fee (e.g., $2.00 for individual entries, $5.00 for group entries) and donate the proceeds to a local soup kitchen, food pantry, or charity.
  • Some institutions may have to seek a waiver from their parent organization for serving food.
  • Create an entry form (paper or electronic). Ask for: entry type (individual or group), contact info, title of entry, book/title/author that inspired the entry, special needs (like space, electricity, etc…), and whether or not the entrant plans to bring along a copy of the book that inspired the creation (otherwise the library should plan to get a copy).
  • On the entry form, emphasize the need for safe food handling practices and that the entrants should bring a utensil to cut/carve their creation.
  • Create placards for each of the entrants with the book title, name, etc…
  • Have utensils, cups, and plates for the day of the event.
  • On the day of the event: have entrants bring their creations at least 30 minutes to 1 hour beforehand, to allow for set-up.
  • Leave some time for judging. We had ballots printed up and used a popular vote methods. Other libraries use guest “judges.”
  • Arrange for certificates and prizes (if funding allows).
  • Announce the winners and “eat” the books.
  • We even got a shout-out on the local news.
Our Iceberg is Melting Punch

Our Iceberg is Melting Punch – my entry for our Edible Book Festival

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My library now has 6 iPads available for checkout. At this point, they’re pretty much still the “out of the box” version, with few apps installed. I’m working with a group of library staff and a student worker to determine which apps to install, and also to devise a user survey.

As expected, the iPads have checked out like hotcakes. If we had double the amount of iPads, they’d still all be checked out!

Students, faculty, and staff can check out an iPad on a first come, first serve basis. No reservations. We allow the iPads to leave the library. The loan period is 7 days.

Here’s the list of apps that I’m interested in installing. Do you have any suggestions?

Reference & Information

  • Dictionary.com (free)
  • EasyBib (free)
  • Epicurious (free)
  • Fandango Movies (free)
  • Google Earth (free)
  • Google Maps – comes installed
  • Google Search (free)
  • IMDB (free)
  • Kayak (free)
  • Periodic Table (free)
  • Shazam (free)
  • Urbanspoon (free)
  • The Weather Channel (free)
  • WebMD (free)
  • Wikipanion (free)

Productivity

  • Evernote (free)
  • GarageBand ($4.99)
  • iMovie ($4.99)
  • Keynote (presentations) - purchased & installed ($9.99)
  • Mail - comes installed
  • Numbers (spreadsheets) - purchased & installed ($9.99)
  • Pages (word processing) – purchased & installed ($9.99)

Utilities

  • Calendar – comes installed
  • Calculator Pro ($0.99)
  • Dragon Dictation (free)
  • Dropbox (free)
  • Mint.com (free)
  • Notes – comes installed

Social Media

  • Facebook (free)
  • Foursquare (free)
  • Skype (free)
  • Twitter (free)
  • Yelp (free)

Photography & Video

  • Camera - comes installed
  • FaceTime – comes installed
  • Instapad (free)
  • Photo Booth - comes installed
  • PS Express (Photoshop Express) (free)

Games

  • Angry Birds HD Free (free)
  • Bejeweled Blitz (free)
  • Checkers (free)
  • Chess Free (free)
  • Fruit Ninja HD Lite (free)
  • Minesweeper (free)
  • NY Times Crosswords (free)
  • Pocket Piano (free)
  • Solitaire (free)
  • Sodoku Lite (free)
  • Temple Run (free)
  • TicTacFree (free)
  • Words with Friends HD Free (free)

News

  • ABC News (free)
  • BBC News (free)
  • Bloomberg (free)
  • CBS News for iPad (free)
  • CNET (free)
  • CNN (free)
  • ESPN ScoreCenter XL (free)
  • Flipboard (free)
  • Fox News (free)
  • Huffington Post (free)
  • MTV News (free)
  • Mashable (free)
  • NPR (free)
  • NY Times (free for “top news”)
  • The Onion (free)
  • Slate (free)
  • USA Today (free)
  • Washington Post (free)
  • WBAY, WLUK, WGBA (iPad apps of local TV stations – each are free)

Entertainment/Streaming Video & Audio

  • ABC Player (free)
  • Hulu Plus (free, but user needs Hulu subscription)
  • NBC (free)
  • Netflix (free, but user needs Netflix subscription)
  • Pandora (free)
  • PBS (free)
  • TED (free)
  • YouTube - comes installed

Books & Materials

  • Amazon Mobile (free)
  • CourseSmart (free)
  • Free Books (free)
  • iBooks (free)
  • Shakespeare (free)

Note: List modified, 2/27/2012

If you have experiences with iPads in the library, let me know! I’m looking for apps that would interest our students, faculty, and staff.

Also, if you’re thinking about getting iPads for your library, check out:

Setting Up a Library iPad Program – Sara Q. Thompson, College & Research Libraries News, April 2011

Tisch Library at Tufts University has some good information for their patrons about their loanable iPads.

Circulating iPads in an Academic Library – presentation by Jodi Bennett & Jessica Hutchings at the Wisconsin Association of Academic Librarians 2011 Conference.

@ Your Library – iPads! – information, handouts, and videos from L.E. Phillips Memorial Public Library in Eau Claire, WI.

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